Announcing a Manufacturing Dual Credit Program With Lakeland Community College

cobra_rWe are very excited to announce that Paris High School will be offering a college co-credit series of manufacturing courses through Lakeland Community College in the Fall of 2015. The new Paris High School campus will house a new CAM Master Cobra CNC router as well as a nine station Aidex Armitrol lab that includes centers for learning about mechanical drives, electrical AC/DC systems, electric relay control, electrical fabrication, controls technology, fluid power, pneumatics, metrology, and robotics.  We have had two staff members from our vocational department receive extensive training to use the equipment and guide our students through the learning standards set for the courses. As a result of finishing these courses, our students will earn industry certification and  will be able to:

  • Illustrate outlines as discernible shapes of solids.
  • Draw sharp, clear, dark uniform lines; letter 1/8” tall vertical upper case.
  •  Read and document accurate measurements.
  • Use proper techniques to make sketches and technical drawings.
  • Demonstrate the use of a Computer‑Aided Drafting system to create simple to moderately complex technical drawings.
  • Understand how to use absolute, relative and polar coordinate entry methods in a CAD drawing.
  • Describe the purpose of Draw commands and how to use them.
  • Describe the purpose of Modify commands and how to use them.
  • Demonstrate how  to dimension a drawing and the purpose of the most common dimensioning commands.
  • Demonstrate how  to reuse drawing objects and to transfer them from one drawing to another using the Block, Wblock and Insert commands.  Identify career opportunities and work applications in the manufacturing field.
  • Perform programming and application techniques required to complete complex machining assignments.
  • Work will be performed on a computer numerically controlled milling machine and lathe.
  • Calculate spindle speeds and cutting speeds for a CNC machine.
  • Write and execute a program for a CNC mill.
  • Calculate programming coordinates using mathematical methods.
  • Setup tool and fixture offsets on a CNC machining center.
  • Write and execute a program for a CNC lathe.
  • Write on-line and off-line robot programs and operate robot using the programs.
  • Develop applications of Robots to include interfacing of additional actuators to the system.
  • Demonstrate CAD for practical applications to include Schematic Drawings, Sectional and Isometric Drawings, and facilities layout.
  • Discuss basic purpose and function of Computer-Aided Manufacturing.
  • Predict and calculate effects of induction and capacitance.
  • Read, interpret, design and operate basic control and sequencing control logic circuits.
  • Plan and install basic wiring systems.
  • Describe, construct, and operate different hydraulic and pneumatic circuits.
  • Describe principals of hydraulic/pneumatic flow and pressure controls and components used to provide control.
  • Program, set up, and operate online and offline CNC mill programs.
  • Setup and operate manual machine tools.
  • List and demonstrate how to use basic machining hand tools.
  • Describe, select, and apply proper drive systems for an application.
  • Discuss and calculate speed and torque changes throughout a power drive system.
  • Solve problems discovered using SPC.
  • Determine part quality using geometric dimensioning and tollerancing.
  • Use measuring equipment to determine the dimensions of parts.

#makeschooldifferent

phsstageMaking today’s school relevant to the needs and wants (yes, I said wants) of today’s students needs to start with the adults who work for the kids.  The narrative of the school has to change.  It cannot be told by the adults in a first person vernacular.  We, the educators have to learn that our part in the learning process is to help set the stage for student learning, not dictate it. The “I” part of the story needs to disappear from all parts of the process except for in the students role.  “I do not have to make all of the decisions.”  “I do not have to be the only source of information.”  “I am not the expert and my role is to facilitate.”  “WE are only as good as we let the students be!”  The change starts at the top of the school organization.  The leaders in the process must model for the staff and the learning community.  Like the teacher in the classroom, the leader needs to do all that can be done to set the stage, provide for the conditions needed, and work on getting out of the way.

Let’s Quit Mocking the Test!

11682228586_08ddb5c972_mTo my dismay, I had a fellow administrator tell me that their school was going to do mock PARCC exam drills this coming month.  Every part of the day is going to be “test-like”!  “We really need to get the kids ready for the test conditions they are going to face”….???? Maybe I am wrong, but I think the thing we need to QUIT getting kids ready for tests.  We need to quit letting testing drive our proverbial “school bus”!  We need to get to quit doing anything that does not have our students engaged in asking questions, testing ideas, and attempting to make physical solutions to everyday needs.

Photo courtesy of TJ Gehling’s Flickr photostream

The New PHS “FAB Lab” (STEM) Fabulous for Learning!

stemImagine a space in a school building where students spend time working with research specialists from throughout the region in a state of the art research laboratory.  A student may work along side a research professional from Lilly Labs researching pharmaceutical health solutions, collaborate with a chemist from General Mills to create tasty new corn products, communicate with a bio-medical research team in Israel about a current local experiment involving the study of cancer cells at PHS, or study the latest in robotics and their applications at local industries such as North American Lighting or Simonton Windows.

The goal of the inclusion of this lab in the new Paris High School is to create “real life” learning experiences where students are linked to the rest of the world through research projects.  The STEM (Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics) room will be larger than the size of four regular classrooms and will be zoned to have biological, chemistry, and physics centers where regular classes can go to conduct research and participate in various projects related to course curriculum.  The room can also serve as a center for advance projects done by upperclassmen under the mentorship of classroom teachers and outside experts.  

The students will be able to present findings in media rich environment in the room’s “think tank” area which will be equipped with monitors, speakers, and computer that will connect them with the world as both an audience and an academic resource.  Over all our goal will be to have students conduct high-level research, communicate with local, community, and worldwide audiences via web-based videoconferencing, and partner with a number of universities and corporations to learn practical applications of current science and technical studies.  The room will allow students from vocational and academic courses to co-mingle as they prepare for further academic study or entry into the workforce after leaving high school.  The funding for this venture is available because local philanthropists care about the education of the youth of this community and we could not create a space like this without their help.  If you would like to know how you can become involved in this venture, please contact us at PHS (217) 466-1175.

So What has Happened Since I Became a Connected Educator?

  • The first PHSprincipalBlog (changed to Director 4/1/2009) post was on 9/18/2007.       (404 posts overall)
  • I have been on Twitter for 6 years, 10 months, 2 weeks, 2 days, 5 hours, 27 minutes, 23 seconds (Nov. 29, 2007) according to http://howlonghaveyoubeentweeting.com

My activity on my blog as well as on Twitter have diminished as of late. I still find an incredible amount of value/entertainment by engaging in the online discussions, I just find it harder to make time to write and send out 140 character tidbits.  My participation in these discussions has ebbed and flowed over the past four years and I am sure I will get more bursts of blogging energy.  As I contemplate these little facts, I am really surprised that I have been at it so long.  Time is passing at what seems like an ever increasing rate.  I would swear that every year I live gets shorter! One question that has surfaced in my mind of late is how have these “practices” changed me?  Changed our school?  Has there been a real value created for the teachers and students at PCHS?

Changes in my personal practice
  1. I have discovered a wide range of educational bloggers, created an RSS feed for my favorites, and read the ideas and thoughts of my favorites everyday.  I think carving out a part of my day to read about what others are doing in their schools has been one of the most productive changes I have made.
  2. I have made presentations to administrators across the state about using social media to connect to one another and to inform their practice.  (an example)
  3. I use Youtube to inform my school community and Board of Education. (example)
  4. Attended ISTE 11 and met many educators who share similar passions about making public education stronger by using modern technology to engage and connect students. (Live From the Blogger Cafe)
  5. Committed myself to lead my staff by being a transparent learner.  I have been become a SMART certified trainer, a Google Apps for Education Certified Trainer, a regular user of Evernote and Diigo to catalogue Internet resources, as well as a Twitter and Facebook in the classroom proponent.
  6. Have been a regular user of an iPad and iPhone to make my daily work more efficient.

“So what?” You may ask.  Well, so what is what I say as well.  Because none of that means a thing to anybody but me.  If all I have done is taught my self how to use these tools then I have failed to lead.  I have failed to make much of a difference in the lives of students and the learning experiences they have a on a daily basis.

So what has changed at PCHS?  

  1. The first blog a PCHS was not mine, nor was the second, (both by our former Librarian/Curriculum Specialist-Sarah Hill), but my act of accepting the challenge to blog (again by Ms. Hill) eventually led to a steady group of PCHS teacher bloggers.
  2. Not only have teachers started blogging a PCHS, we also have several groups of students that are blogging (here, and here, for example). By the way, they love to see that people from across the country and world visit their blogs!
  3. A small legion (is there such a thing?) of PCHS teachers have joined Twitter and occasionally they actually tweet something.  I know they lurk more than actively participate, but several are drinking from the fire hose of educational content that flows on Twitter. Our AP Literature class  has had #hashtag chats about the books they are reading and the teacher has used a Twitter back-channel to promote in-class discussion.
  4. Did I mention that some of our teachers are blogging?  Check out this top Art Blog by our own @DestinGirl73
  5. Our freshman English classes have done online-Shakespeare projects where students have created “Facebook-like” pages for the characters and have interacted with students from different sections virtually using different Web 2.0 tools.
  6. I think one of the best by-products of our experimentation with transparent learning has been our willingness to take risks.  This past fall we decided to do an all school thematic-project based learning unit where we turned off the bells, disregarded normal class grouping patterns and let the students and teacher work together to solve engaging problems…check out PumpkinPalooza2011!  We just did a presentation about this project to the Illinois High Schools Connections Conference!
  7. We have begun to see where subject areas and individual classes are beginning to “cross-pollinate”.  Chemistry classes and clothing classes are meeting together. Geometry classes and Consumer Science classes are finding common ground and are meeting together.  Art and English. Welding and Art. English and Science.  We may find that we can build high school co-credit classes where students can earn more that just a credit in one area, they may earn credit for (for example Geometry and Drafting) two classes at the same time.  The possibilities are being explored.  That is the most exciting thing.
  8. Students are meeting with human resources both virtually and in “real life” on a more regular basis.  We have had students visit local businesses and have had visitors to classrooms via the Internet as well conventionally.
We still have a lot of work to do, but I feel more strongly than ever before that we are willing to meet the challenges to make our learning environments relevant and engaging.  We have the unique opportunity to design and build a new school complex that will be both flexible and transparent and able to accommodate learning for today’s world and the challenges of tomorrow.
I AM SO GLAD I STARTED TO BLOG AND TWEET!

The REAL Challenge Begins Now!

IgotuWhat happens when 100 adults and 500 teenagers “lower the waterline” and let others really know them?  What is the affect of bullies telling their victims they are sorry in front of a large crowd of their peers?  How do students react when they find out that many of their school peers have experienced some horrible emotional situations?  What is it like for students when their teachers, school administrators, school board members, and other community members share true stories about their lives and shed a tear or two?  What is the affect of six hours of laughing, dancing, listening, crying, hugging, and caring for people in ways you have never done before?  CULTURE CHANGE!  The building of empathy and understanding. The realization that we are all so much more alike than different.  The awareness of what we say, do with and to others has a major effect that can be both life affirming or devastating.  BUT, it will only happen if we care enough to carry through with it….and it all begins with YOU!

I have said before, many times, that our students don’t care what we know until they know we care.  We have tried very hard to build school community and trust here the past several years in an effort to improve school performance.  I think we may have really turned a corner this past week.  We shut down the bell system, slowed down the prescribed learning and perhaps learned the most important lesson of all; We all matter!  I hope what we have seen the past several days is a new normal.  That we can all continue to have each others’ back and be real with one another.  I know that initially this past week’s activities have made an impact.  You can see it and feel it in the hallways and classrooms.  Our new challenge is to keep this new “attitude” alive!  I know it is up to me and I am the change!  I hope you will join me and commit the same pledge.